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Costa Rica saw the worst deterioration on the latest Transparency International Corruption Perception Index. Here capital San Jose. (Photo: Costa Rica Government)
Wednesday, January 30, 2019
Trade Talk

Latin America: Corruption Grows


Latin American CEO pessimism grows.

BY LATINVEX STAFF

Corruption in Brazil and Mexico worsened, but improved in Argentina, according to the latest Corruption Perceptions Index from Germany-based watchdog Transparency International.

Overall, Latin America saw another deterioration, according to a Latinvex analysis of the Transparency International score for 19 Latin American countries.

Costa Rica suffered the worst deterioration, with its score dropping 3 percentage points to 56, but the Central American nation remains among the three most transparent countries in Latin America.

“At the bottom of the index, Venezuela remains stuck ..., reflecting systemic and persistent corruption across the country,” Transparency says.

 

Latin America Corruption: Best & Worst

Ranked by transparency rank

LA Rk

Gl Rk

Country

Score

Ch

1

23

Uruguay

70

2

27

Chile

67

3

48

Costa Rica

56

-3

4

61

Cuba

47

5

85

Argentina

40

1

6

93

Panama

37

7

99

Colombia

36

-1

8

105

Brazil

35

-2

8

105

El Salvador

35

2

8

105

Peru

35

2

11

114

Ecuador

34

2

12

129

Dom. Rep.

30

1

13

132

Bolivia

29

-4

13

132

Honduras

29

13

132

Paraguay

29

16

138

Mexico

28

-1

17

144

Guatemala

27

-1

18

152

Nicaragua

25

-1

19

168

Venezuela

18

Average

37.2

-0.5

LA Rk=Latin America rank

Gl Rk=Global rank

Ch: Change in score from 2016 index

Sources: Corruption Perceptions Index 2018, Transparency International; Latinvex (change)

 

CEO PESSIMISM GROWS

Optimism among Latin American CEOs has declined, in line with global sentiment among their peers, according to the latest annual CEO survey from PwC released at World Economic Forum in Davos.

The survey shows that 23 percent of CEOs believe global growth will decline, up from only 5 percent a year earlier. Globally, 29 percent of CEOs concur, also up from 5 percent last year.

“All over the world, we have seen populist politicians exercise increasing influence over economic policy,” the PwC report says. “There is a perceptible shift away from reliance on global governance structures designed to facilitate cooperation on pressing issues such as trade, climate change, and nuclear proliferation. The result has been one recognized by the World Economic Forum: a trend toward nation-state unilateralism and, consequently, greater global fragmentation and uncertainty.”

Populism is considered the top threat in Latin America, followed by over-regulation and policy uncertainty.  Among top ten threats this year that weren’t even included last year are policy uncertainty, trade conflicts and protectionism.

To see what multinational CEOs say about the outlook in Latin America, see the Latinvex special report. 


© Copyright Latinvex

 

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